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Thread: Look at this...

  1. #361
    Supporting Member LuseKofte's Avatar
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    Team Fusion LARRY69's Avatar
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    Re: Look at this...



    Yang Kyoungjong, a Korean who is the only known man to have fought in the Imperial Japanese Army, the Soviet Army and the German Wehrmacht after his capture by the Americans on Utah Beach. June, 1944.
    http://i1364.photobucket.com/albums/r739/larry691/GZ-H%201_zpsdphexiii.jpg

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    Re: Look at this...

    Last edited by LARRY69; Nov-29-2018 at 13:14.
    http://i1364.photobucket.com/albums/r739/larry691/GZ-H%201_zpsdphexiii.jpg

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  7. #364
    Supporting Member LuseKofte's Avatar
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    Re: Look at this...

    I have dived on many wrecks and hunted in mountains and visited many crash side. Here are some of them.

    This picture is taken by a fellow diver(Frank Bang), not a close friend, but we meet once in a while. It was my first ever planewreck dive. One week after this plane was found I dived on it, A Dornier 26 , only one remain in the world. Like the JU 52 it supplied defeated and retreating German soldiers and got under fire from a English destroyer during the prosess. (April 1940 in Rombakfjord) I think the crew managed to get ashore and was taken to Sweden and home. One week after it was found the forward MG 15 was gone, it was found again in Sweden and returned to the museum in Narvik. So relichunters can do much damage. The cockpitpanels of the plane is also now in this museum.

    Growing up among crashed airplanes and other relics after the nearby mountains and sea. I was a avid wreck diver before and have dived on many ditched planes. The picture taken here is not taken by me, but I have been there. And was there in the start of recovering the nose cannon, now installed in a complete HE 111 in a museum
    The Lufttorpedostaffel attacked convoy PQ 17 three times this day. The "Löwengeschwader" KG 26 lost four Heinkels:
    WNr.7098 1H+GH (Lt.Konrad Hennemann)
    WNr.7156 1H+MH (Lt.Georg Kaunmeyr).
    WNr.4966 ditched in the Barents sea. In addition a BV 138C (WNr.0310119 7R+HH) was lost.
    The crew were brought to Tromsø onboard a German patrol boat the day after the crash.
    The next day another He 111 of I./KG 26 (WNr.7084) made a forced landing in the sea at Malangen. Luftwaffe lost 11 aircrafts during the attacks on convoy PQ 17
    The crew of this airplane was rescued by a local freight boat and the captain was ordered to tow it ashore, the boat got "problems with the engine" and the plane sunk. One of the passangers was a 10 year old passanger, he aimed at landmarks on two different places and was able to point the location of its whereabouts to a friend of mine, this is why I was one of the first to dive on that plane

    MOVIE INTO THE WHITE
    Code:
    Partridge’s Skua on display at the Fleet Air Museum in Yeovilton, Somerset England It was recovered from the bottom of the lake which, 
    frozen at the time,. 
    The Heinkel 111 P2 is one of the most pristine static restored Heinkel 111 in the world. It is in Gardermoen on Norsk Luftfartmuseum. 
    The war grave is from UFFS Hauck witch died in the air battle with the Skua. HE was temporary buried behind Grotli Hotel. 
    While trying to bring his sputtering plane into a safe landing, Partridge spotted an old reindeer hunter’s cabin not too far away. 
    They hiked there through the snow, only to soon be set upon by the German crew with pistols and knives at the ready.
    Thinking quickly and trying to break down the language barrier in a mix of German and English, Partridge convinced 
    the Germans that he and Bostock were survivors of a downed Vickers Wellington Bomber (and not the aces that had brought their plane down).
    The film adaptation of these events goes quite off course from this point. It portrays both crews staying in the cabin together, 
    the British indignantly sitting as POWs while starting to warm up to their roommates and all cooperating more together over a series of many stormy nights 
    while the food quickly runs out.
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    In truth, according to Schopis’ memoirs, Partridge had suggested on the first day they met that the Germans stay in the 
    cabin and the Brits look elsewhere for shelter. That night, the British stumbled upon the Grotli Hotel, closed for the winter, but offering shelter from the harsh weather.
    The Germans arrived the next morning, and all shared breakfast together.
    Partridge and Strunk left that day to search for people and, hopefully, save both crews from dying. It would be no use to either party 
    to be found dead from starvation when the seasons finally changed
    They quickly found a Norwegian ski patrol, close enough to the hotel that Bostock could hear the shot being fired which he assumed was Feldwebel Strunk killing his captain. But it was Strunk who lay dead, reportedly shot by the ski patrol as he reached for his pistol.
    Schopis and Auchtor were taken into custody by the Norwegians, turned over to the British, and eventually sent to a POW camp in Canada where they spent the remainder of the war.
    Partridge and Bostock, under suspicion for their cooperation with Germans, managed to convince the Norwegians they were, at least, 
    English by showing them their uniforms’ tailor labels and a half crown coin. Also, through a huge stroke of luck, the commander of the ski patrol happened to have some mutual acquaintances with Partridge.
    The two British flyers were set free and hiked to Alesund, a town on the Norwegian coast, many miles away and under heavy German attack. 
    The ship that was supposed to evacuate them and other British soldiers never arrived, so they stole a car and drove to northeast to Andelsnes, 
    where they managed to secure passage back to England.
    In June 1940, while assaulting the German battleship Scharnhorst, Partridge was shot down and captured by the Germans, 
    spending the rest of the war as a POW. Bostock, once again flying a Blackburn Skua, was killed in the same battle.
    Many years later, in 1977, Schopis received a phone call from Partridge, and the two met as friends in their hometowns of Munich and London.
    Partridge’s Skua was recovered and sits on display at the Fleet Air Museum in Yeovilton, Somerset, England. (Schopis’s wrecked Heinkel still waits,
     atop the lonely mountains near Grotli, Norway.) Latter not true, there are remains, but the plane is as stated the one in Luft museum
    By Colin Fraser for War History Online


    The dramatized movie of the event was not inaccurate in the big picture, but spiced up a bit


    Partridge’s Skua on display at the Fleet Air Museum in Yeovilton, Somerset England. It was recovered from the bottom of the lake which, frozen at the time, Partridge landed on.


    Here is the Heinkel. In a museum outside Oslo Gardermoen airport
    Kampfgeschwader 4 ”General Wever” 5J+CN
    Initially hit in the right engine by AAA from HMS Manchester before it was shot down



    The remains of the Skua was recovered in 1974 during summer.


    Pilot of the Heinkel 111 Horst Schopis, visited the crash site in 2009 Aged 97 year old


    The temporary grave of UFFS Hauck that died in the air battle with the Skua




    Code:
    From my fortheens birthday I spent a lot of time in the mountains hunting for Mountain Grouse . Up there there was some plane wrecks , Two of them was a Fokker CVD light bomber and recce plane build in Netherland in late 1920ś . It did important recce and bomber duties. One in particular was shot down by a pursuing HE 111 bomber.
    The Norwegian air forces in Narvik was used several times for important duties as recognizance, photographing and bombing of enemy positions. 
    The force consisted of old Fokker and Heinkel bombers. On the 4th of May the air fleet was attacked by German planes. It was a unfair battle, 
    and the old bombers had little they could do against the modern German planes. One of the Fokker planes, 
    piloted by lieutenant Håkon Kyllingmark, was attacked by a Heinkel 111. He did all his efforts to get it of him, 
    but the plane continued to follow the Fokker. It shot several burst at the plane, and a last powerful burts made the plane loose control and crash. Kyllingmark was thrown out of the cockpit and became unconscious. Lieutenant Eggen was stuck inside the plane, with both arms and legs broken. 
    He shouted on Kyllingmark, who was to weak to help Eggen. Kyllingmark was able to shot 10-15 gun shots, but nobody came. He started walking, 
    and after two kilometers in deep, rotten snow and difficult terrain he met a machine gun crew. 
    He had fainted for more than 10 times and fantasized in the snow. After 12-14 hours they both came under medical attention.
    The other Fokker had difficulty separating friend and foe and landed close to soldiers they believed was friendly, 
    After landing it got under MG fire and the pilots was taken prisoner. The wreck picture is from this Fokker.
    And I simply can not atm find pictures of the other. The engine from this fokker are placed in Narvik War museum

    Code:
    A remarkable photo showing a 46 Squadron Hurricane taking off from HMS Glorious en route to Skanland, 
    Norway on 26th May 1940. As the first two Hurricanes came in to land they encountered soft ground and nosed over. 
    The rest of the Hurricanes were diverted to Bardufoss, where they would remain for their short stay in Norway.

    Code:
    Hurricane Crash site :
    Nine Hurricanes were up on patrol when they met a big force of 26 Luftwaffe bombers approaching Vestfjorden. 
    Pilot Officer Neville Lavis Banks and F/O Jack W Lydall attacked three He.111, north of Lødingen. 
    Two of the Heinkels were shot down. One Heinkel crash-landed at Ulvsvåg on Hamarøy. 
    The other one, shot down by Lydall,made a forced landing at Skogvollmyra. Both Hurricane pilots were also shot down and killed.
    Banks Hurricane crashed into Skjæringstad river at Strand in Lødingen. 
    Lydall was shot down by either Messerschmitt Bf 110 or Metzkes Heinkel, and crashed at Tjeldøya
    Pictures from 1997. Kindly provided by Arne H Hansen
    When Germany attacked France a immediate redraw of British, Polish and French troops took place , 
    and Norway capitulated. In this prosess the plan was to set the Hurricanes in Bardufoss on fire
     But Squadron Leader Refused to do so, He and his men successfully landed their Hurricanes on the Carrier HMS Glorious . 
    Most got their wet grave when Glorious was sunk on their way to Scapa Flow.
    The aircraft carrier HMS Glorious was returning to Scapa Flow from Norway separately from the other ships in the British Force, 
    accompanied by only her destroyer escorts HMS Acasta and HMS Ardent. It was a fine clear day with light wind but 
    HMS Glorious apparently did not have a lookout posted, did not have an aircraft on patrol –
     which would have given her all round visibility of approximately 40 miles, and did not have any of her 
    aircraft on deck ready for immediate launch.
    She was therefore surprised when spotted by the German battleships Gneisenau and Scharnhorst at about 1600. 
    Although Acasta and Ardent attempted to lay a smoke screen and engaged the German ships, 
    Glorious was first hit at 1638. The third salvo from the Scharnhorst reached Glorious from 24,175 meters (26,450 yards), 
    possibly the longest gunfire hit on any enemy warship ever achieved. It hit her hangars and made it impossible to launch 
    the aircraft that were on the point of readiness.
    Last edited by LuseKofte; Mar-06-2019 at 11:31.

  8. #365
    Supporting Member LuseKofte's Avatar
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    Re: Look at this...

    Sometimes I do not wish to fact check , I just want to believe
    Well known story but I repeat it









    Sgt Charles Stuart Mackenzie

    Scotland has had more than it’s fair share of heroes from the past to present. From popular and famous warrior’s such as William Wallace to Robert the Bruce, to famous writers such as Robert Burns and Walter Scott. The list is endless. But one of the most inspiring and unsung heroes of our country is virtually unknown to many, the infamous Sgt. Charles Stuart Mackenzie.

    The sad truth about Charles Mackenzie is that not much is known about him. No date of birth nor any information about his younger years are available. What we do know however is the harrowing tale of how he gave his life defending and saving his fallen friend and comrades on the battlefield.

    During the years of ww1, Sgt Charles Stuart Mackenzie departed for France with the Seaforth Highlanders. His time spent there was cut short however after he was shot in the shoulder and ordered to return home for treatment. Whilst being treated by the surgeon, he was told that he was going to have to have his arm amputated. Sgt Mackenzie refused however, emphasising the fact he had to get back to his men in France. His loyalty to his men is something that would never leave him.

    His loyalty wasn’t the only thing that makes him such an inspiration. On returning home from France after he was shot he was asked the question “what’s it like to kill the hun?” (Hun being a reference for German) to which he replied “what a waste of a fine body of men”. The respect and humanity he showed even towards his enemy after he had been shot showed the type of character he had.

    After refusing to get his arm amputated, he embarked for France to meet up with his brothers in arms for one last final time. During a firefight with the Germans one of his soldiers who was also a close friend fell, badly injured. Knowing that the Germans were closing in and that they would almost certainly overrun their position he was left with a decision to make, stay and defend his fallen friend or flee and fall back to an area of safety. In what can only be described as an act of heroics, he stood his ground and fixed a bayonet to his gun. As the Germans began to charge, he stood and fought them in close combat using the bayonet on his rifle and his bare hands and feet. After killing several German soldiers he was inevitably and eventually struck down. He died on the battlefield due to bayonet wounds at the age of 35.

    Due to his bravery and sacrifice that day he saved the life of his fallen friend and also of many more injured soldiers who lay behind him. Below is a quote from his great grandson Joseph Kilna Mackenzie.

    “To the best of my knowledge, and taken from reports of the returning soldiers, one of his close friends fell, badly wounded. Charles stood his ground and fought until he was overcome and died from bayonet wounds. On that day, my great grandmother and my grandmother were sitting at the fire when the picture fell from the wall. My great grandmother looked, and said to my grandmother “Oh, my bonnie Charlie’s dead”. Sure enough a few days passed, and the local policeman brought the news – that Sgt. Charles Stuart MacKenzie had been killed in action. This same picture now hangs above my fireplace. A few years back my wife Christine died of cancer, and in my grief I looked at his picture to ask what gave him the strength to go on. It was then, in my mind, that I saw him lying on the field and wondered what his final thoughts were. The words and music just appeared into my head. I believe the men and women like yourself who are prepared to stand their ground for their family – for their friends – and for their country; deserve to be remembered, respected and honoured.” – Joseph Kilna Mackenzie

    Joseph Kilna Mackenzie wrote a lament for his grandfather, named Sgt. Mackenzie. You may have heard some of it before if you have watched we were soldiers or end of watch in which the tune has been featured in. The words and the beautiful music of the bagpipes will send shivers down your back, it is a touching and beautiful tribute to such a great man. There is a copy of the lyrics at the bottom and a translation to English as it is written in Scots.

    Although little is known about Charles Stuart Mackenzie, what we do know clearly show us the type of man he was. His courage, bravery, and loyalty even in his final moments, the fact he was willing to sacrifice and lay down his life to try and save a fallen friend is something that has to be admired. The humility, respect and dignity he conducted himself with is an inspiration in itself and to us all. The legend of Sgt Mackenzie will hopefully be remembered for a number of years to come. They say that “not all heroes wear capes”, which is true, as they tend to wear kilts instead.

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  10. #366
    Supporting Member LuseKofte's Avatar
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    Re: Look at this...

    This gave me a new perspective of owning a 3 D printer

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  12. #367
    Supporting Member LuseKofte's Avatar
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    Re: Look at this...

    53816989_2214615115272426_1822527148234113024_n.jpg

    A student and instructor were doing a session of touch and goes the instructor silenced the gear horn because, and I quote, “it was noisy and we were talking”

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  14. #368
    ATAG Server Operator ATAG_kiwiflieger's Avatar
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    Re: Look at this...

    For those annoying occasions when you're stuck in the middle of nowhere out of helicopter rescue range, but you have a really long string and a helium balloon...



    "Speed is life. Altitude is life insurance. Surprise is key."


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    Re: Look at this...

    Quote Originally Posted by ATAG_kiwiflieger View Post
    For those annoying occasions when you're stuck in the middle of nowhere out of helicopter rescue range, but you have a really long string and a helium balloon...
    This technique was show in the movie "Green Berets" (1968).

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  17. #370
    Team Fusion LARRY69's Avatar
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    Re: Look at this...

    World's First Air Hijack - Allied Aircrew's Daring 1942 Escape

    The world's first air hijacker was a South African Air Force pilot serving with the RAF. Find out how he and his British and New Zealand crew managed to free themselves from Italian captivity by the novel method of hijacking the aircraft that rescued them!


    https://youtu.be/YvuQQaQLDPQ?fbclid=...zdCvNbAOvMOFmY
    http://i1364.photobucket.com/albums/r739/larry691/GZ-H%201_zpsdphexiii.jpg

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  19. #371
    Supporting Member Kendy for the State's Avatar
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    Re: Look at this...

    Quote Originally Posted by 1lokos View Post
    This technique was show in the movie "Green Berets" (1968).
    Also used at the end of James Bond, "You only Live Twice". Or was that "Thunderball"?

    I just checked... it was Thunderball where they did the skyhook.
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  20. #372
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    Re: Look at this...

    Quote Originally Posted by LuseKofte View Post
    This gave me a new perspective of owning a 3 D printer

    about 3d printing......i might have a certain Fw190 3d model lying around

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