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Thread: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

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    New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Few of us have taken the opportunity to learn the early Hurricane Mk I with the DH5-20 two-speed prop because, quite frankly, it's a dog in combat. Out of general interest, I started flying both the 87 octane and 100 octane variants of this old bird and discovered a hidden attribute I find very useful for training new pilots. Simplicity is essential for those learning to fly airplanes for the first time and this Hurricane Mk I can be used for training the same way that an airplane with a non-complex engine and fixed landing gear can be used. By leaving the propeller at the default fast pitch setting, it can be controlled like a simple airplane.

    If you know nothing about airplanes or flying, I recommend selecting the 87 Octane model simply because it gives you plenty of time to work on control during takeoff. The 100 octane version will significantly improve performance after learning the basics of flying. My recommendation for the fledgling aviator who wants to try learning RAF Fighters without an instructor is:

    Download a flight manual - OP2GvSAPINST_3710.1B.pdf has all the Cliffs of Dover (CLoD) Airplanes' operating limits and basic flight instructions. The Hurricane MK I section answers nearly all the questions that will arise.

    (Thanks to Highseas) https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-u...w?pref=2&pli=1

    Other manuals are also available online... but during training, stick to a single source document (Flight Manual, Pilots' Notes, etc.) because it is easy to find conflicting data and procedures in different "How to fly" books due to wartime modifications. When first learning to fly, avoid confusion by sticking with your favorite (generally accurate) manual.

    Airplane - "Hurricane Mk I DH 5-20" implies that it's using 87 Octane fuel. This is equipped with a "Variable (2-speed)" as opposed to a "Constant speed" propeller pitch controller. This permits throttle-only engine operation for beginners with prop at the default "Fine Pitch" setting. Set it and forget it!

    Airfield - Choose a non-combat airfield with a paved runway such as RAF Ford or Biggin Hill. The pavement provides a "Target" for airport operations like taking off and landing. On a grass field, there is less incentive to run straight down the runway.

    Engine operation - For initial training, ignore the "Windowed" digital settings provided by the game. These are the positions of the controls, not the actual effect of the setting displayed. (Example: 90% throttle does not necessarily mean 90% power.) Use the "Real" dials and controls found in the virtual cockpit. With the prop set fine (Default) use engine RPM for power control with the throttle. Leave the radiator shutters in the full open position, and the prop pitch controller alone (Fine) for initial training. See the ops manual for max RPMs for different flight regimes (Climb, cruise, dive, etc.).

    Landing Gear operation - Optional for initial training, but remember it must be actuated twice if you choose to retract it. (Once into the neutral position, then again to actuate the gear up or down). You can just leave the gear down for initial non-combat training like flying around the airfield. Hawker, in the official Pilots' Notes, even allows bounces (USA-Touch and Go's) with the gear and flaps fully extended. It flies remarkably well at 90-120 MPH configured like this.

    Flaps operation - Optional UP for initial takeoff training, but once again, if you use it at the recommended 28° for takeoff, it must be selected DOWN twice, and then UP one time to stop flap extension travel. For landings, they may be selected DOWN (Twice again), and will then move to the fully extended position. Unlike the Spitfire, you can set the Hurricane's flaps to any intermediate position from UP to DOWN. Add an extra 10 MPH on final, and you can even practice no-flap landings... a real challenge!

    Elevator Trim - Use default (Centered on trim indicator) for a "Normal" takeoff but add 13 key presses of ANU to trim for 150 MPH in a NO FLAP takeoff for pattern only flights. As you slow for landing, keep trimming until you run out of trim. This is full "Aircraft Nose Up" (abbreviated: ANU) and makes all CLoD RAF airplanes so easy and fun to land! On takeoff from a bump, the nose will pitch up if you don't reset to "Centered" before adding power. There's lots of time to reset trim during touch and go's (or Stop & Go's), so don't forget!

    With these basics and some procedural study, you should be able to fly an Hurricane around the airport area as an intro to flight. Our forums have a lot of good advice for advanced flying in CLoD.

    Good Luck!

    Self teaching lessons for new pilots start at post #10 this thread...
    Last edited by Baffin; Jun-19-2017 at 15:40. Reason: manuals advice, formatting, ANU
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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Quote Originally Posted by Baffin View Post

    Download the flight manual - OP2GvSAPINST_3710.1B.pdf has all the Cliffs of Dover (CLoD) Airplanes' operating limits and basic flight instructions. The Hurricane MK I section answers nearly all the questions that will arise.
    Could you point me at this?

    Just did a quick search and it turned up nothing.

    Sounds like a good read.



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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Quote Originally Posted by Highseas View Post
    Could you point me at this?

    Just did a quick search and it turned up nothing.

    Sounds like a good read.

    Please continue searching. I see that some of the more common links are broken, but you can find it. I don't want to pass along a commercial download link.
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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Quote Originally Posted by Baffin View Post
    Please continue searching. I see that some of the more common links are broken, but you can find it. I don't want to pass along a commercial download link.
    No probs. Havent found a non broken link yet. but will keep looking.


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    - Virpil T50 Mongoos with Warthog Grip plus Extension Set -
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    - HighseasPeripherals(tm) - Engine Switch Panel - Munitions Switch Panel - Throttle Quadrant Trim Box - Helicopter Collective - Analogue Brake Lever -

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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-u...JRNHJpYkk/view

    that and Chucks Guide which is superb.
    Last edited by ATAG_Highseas; Jul-08-2016 at 14:25.


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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    There is really no point to flying the 87 octane version of the constant speed Rotol Hurricane instead of the 100 octane version.

    The only major difference is the 100 octane can use the boost cutout at +12. If you don't use boost cutout, it gives you the same performance as an 87 octane version.

    All the other aspects of the two aircraft are essentially identical... except the 100 octane version is less prone to overheat at +6.25 power as it uses higher octane.

    Flying the 87 octane version is just a handicap.

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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Just to confirm....

    it IS a good read

    Example.jpg

    Now THAT is fluid dynamics explained in a way that everyone can understand !
    Last edited by ATAG_Highseas; Jul-08-2016 at 15:22. Reason: Spell Chucker issues... again...


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    - HighseasPeripherals(tm) - Engine Switch Panel - Munitions Switch Panel - Throttle Quadrant Trim Box - Helicopter Collective - Analogue Brake Lever -

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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Quote Originally Posted by Highseas View Post
    Just to confirm....

    it IS a good read

    Example.jpg

    Now THAT is fluid dynamics explained in a way that everyone can understand !
    I'm glad you found a current link! I'm going to file that away for new pilots. I don't know what happened to the old URL's... it used to be so easy to find.
    Last edited by Baffin; Jul-09-2016 at 09:42.
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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Quote Originally Posted by RAF74_Buzzsaw View Post
    There is really no point to flying the 87 octane version of the constant speed Rotol Hurricane instead of the 100 octane version.

    The only major difference is the 100 octane can use the boost cutout at +12. If you don't use boost cutout, it gives you the same performance as an 87 octane version.

    All the other aspects of the two aircraft are essentially identical... except the 100 octane version is less prone to overheat at +6.25 power as it uses higher octane.

    Flying the 87 octane version is just a handicap.
    The recommendation in this thread is for the DeHavilland variable (2-Speed) prop, not the constant speed prop. The objective is to lower engine performance in order to reduce the new pilots' workload during takeoff training. Try it, it's simply a ton of fun!
    Last edited by Baffin; Mar-30-2017 at 10:05.
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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Do It Yourself Takeoff in the "Training Hurricane"

    I understand your frustration with takeoffs in Cliffs of Dover (CLoD) because it is a realistic sim with few options for online play at the “Student” entry level. For that reason, I recommend that you use the “Quick Missions” in offline mode to get a feel for flying the the Hurricane. Another excellent tool, although it uses full realism, is the "ATAG Bomber Server" found in the multiplayer setup menus of CLoD. RAF Ford in this server has excellent runways and light winds... recommended for training. My preparation for these lessons has all been at RAF Ford in the ATAG Bomber Server.

    Find a Hurricane Mk I Ops Limits “Cheat sheet”, so you can practice each checklist (Preliminaries, Starting Engine, Checking Engine and Installations, etc.) until you can safely get the airplane ready to fly on the runway. Print out the Hurricane Mk I pages and keep them handy as you fly.

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-u...w?pref=2&pli=1

    The “Cross Country” mission is very good for starting out from the ground and for repetitive takeoff practice and the “Pause” feature is available for "time-outs" and self-analysis. However, there are two things to remember:

    1. The engine is already running, so you need to shut it down and reposition the cockpit switches and controls if you wish to go through the preflight and startup checks.

    2. There is a CLoD feature that sets a “Parking brake” on the airplane, even though the real plane may not even have one. In order to move the airplane, you must apply and release the wheel brakes one time to release the parking brake. This is not "Wheel Chocks" so remember to pull the chocks as well if you have set them prior to takeoff.

    For 87 Octane, Flaps UP takeoff practice, you should have at least six “Yellow Board" (sometimes red & white), distance remaining markers on your runway’s edge to insure sufficient distance before the end of the runway. At RAF Ford, you may taxi to the runway intersection and takeoff and land on the runway with the yellow boards to minimize crosswind. This technique usually holds true for any runway in the game. The yellow boards are the upwind, preferred, takeoff or "active" runway.

    Since you’ve already taught yourself the game systems and airplane cockpit familiarization, you should be able to run the checklists to get to the end of the runway or the intersection at Ford. That’s where the new pilot challenges begin. Here are some Training tips for just getting your feet wet in this “Training” Hurricane.

    In the ATAG Forum:
    Please read: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation – Hurricane MKI.

    http://theairtacticalassaultgroup.co...ad.php?t=22735

    Using this airplane with 87 Octane fuel and the DH-5-20 propeller will get you started with a configuration not unlike a simple, single engine land airplane like a Cessna or Piper.

    Because we will start out in the simple airplane, the checklists will have a number of deviations.

    1. Ignore all reference to propeller pitch control, as you will leave it set fully FINE (Also called Fast or forward). You will normally check this control in the “Starting Engine” checklist, step 4.

    2. Ignore all references to wing flaps for takeoff, because you will leave them UP (Retracted). This is an approved takeoff configuration but adds 90-120 yards to the takeoff run. It is also approved for landing, but this is quite challenging due to the high pitch attitude on final approach. Use full flaps for landing until to have more experience.

    3. Ignore the references to Landing Gear operation. You will leave them down to keep things simple. The airplane is limited to 150 MPH with the gear down, so that will be our maximum speed in the airport area. The Hurricane (And the airspeed indicator pointer) vibrates with gear down at this high speed. This is normal in CLoD.

    4. Set the elevator trim for training by clicking trim ANU (Aircraft Nose UP) 13 times. This sets the trim to 150 MPH indicated airspeed.(IAS) After takeoff, you will find the plane will try to return to 150 MPH by itself due to trim tab forces. Take a look at the trim indicator after setting this and remember the position so that you can re-set it in flight if it becomes changed.

    5. Run the TMPR-FFF check before taking off. Get in the habit of doing this check by memory. This is how you prevent those pesky engine overheats after takeoff.

    1. Trim-SET
    2. Mixture-AUTO RICH
    3. Propeller-FINE
    4. Radiator Shutters-SET (OPEN for takeoff)
    5. Flaps-SET (UP for training)
    6. Fuel-CHECK & SET (Quantity and Shutoff Valve)
    7. Fire Control-SET (Gun Sight Convergence and Wingspan)

    This is your last chance to make sure that critical items are set properly. Missing any one of these items may lead to failures later on. When finished you may use the Cockpit Lights-ON to indicate that you've completed the check. Nobody’s watching… take your time and do it properly to save yourself a lot of grief.

    Here’s how to make a takeoff in the Training Hurricane:

    Precisely align your airplane with the centerline of the runway and set the wheel chocks. It’s helpful to pick out a cloud over the end of the runway as an “Aim Point” as you turn to line up, since you can’t see landmarks on the horizon in front of you. On any runway you can estimate equal distance from the runway's edges by observing both wingtips. On concrete runways, you can also count the paving blocks to find the center.

    For training, check your altimeter for the runway elevation if you don’t have the published elevation handy (it's only 3' at RAF Ford). Add 1000’ to the elevation which equals 1003'… that is your traffic pattern altitude, i.e. your Level Off Target for this training flight (Round off to the nearest 100'). You need to remember that 1000' on the altimeter is your traffic pattern altitude.

    Remove chocks...Here we go!

    1. Look directly through the gunsight or windscreen to find an aim point such as a distant cloud object.

    2. Set full throttle smoothly and aggressively (1-3 seconds) while holding the aim point cloud in one place in the windscreen with your rudder (yaw) controller. Volumes have been written in these forums about throttle-up speed but I teach this “Quick Set” technique in order to reduce the amount of time that takeoff thrust is changing due to pilot input. This allows you to “Set” the rudder early and prevents changing yaw input unnecessarily. This must be practiced over and over and when the airplane becomes uncontrollable, ABORT: Throttle-IDLE, apply back pressure and wheel brakes. Don’t try to save a bad takeoff since no effective training takes place if the airplane heading on the ground is wildly different from that desired. If you crash, you have to go through the entire preflight again, so work on keeping the aim point aligned from throttle up to takeoff.

    3. You can start the takeoff roll without even touching the stick if you have rudder pedals, but this is difficult with "Twist Grip" yaw controllers. Whatever you use, try not to make any elevator inputs until the nose drops. Five to Six seconds after power up, glance down at the airspeed, but continue to concentrate on the aim point. When airspeed is accelerating past 60 MPH, the nose will slowly drop a little as the tail rises. When this happens, gently use stick pressure to align the bottom of the forward windscreen glass with the horizon. Try to avoid aileron input, but use it if you must to control your bank. Maintain wings level.

    4. As you approach 80 MPH, increase back pressure to align the the bottom of the forward windscreen frame with the horizon. Hold this picture and the plane will lift off at 90 MPH. By the time you look at the airspeed indicator, you will probably already be 100 MPH or more due to acceleration.

    5. Hold this picture for about 5 more seconds, (To simulate the time it takes to retract the gear), then lower the nose to align the lower 1/3 of the gun sight with the horizon. This little training exercise will allow the plane to accelerate rapidly to 150 MPH for the climb.

    6. Simultaneously with lowering the nose in step 5 above, reduce the throttle to hold 2850 RPM on the Tachometer. Use the upper right corner of M in “RPM” on the gauge since it’s hard to read the top numbers, and allow the airplane to accelerate to the trim speed of 150 MPH, the Gear down Limit.

    7. You may leave the radiator shutters fully OPEN for training.

    8. Climb to 1000’ above runway height to practice turns and traffic patterns. The gear and flaps remain unchanged to allow practice with stick and throttle while trimmed for 150 MPH.

    Finally, this is not the normal takeoff profile, but is simply way to use the Hurricane for some basic takeoff training.

    Remember, you have to eat an elephant one bite at a time.
    Last edited by Baffin; Jun-19-2017 at 15:27. Reason: Procedure changed. Tail rises naturally.
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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Do It Yourself "Flyin' Around"

    Now that you have successfully taught yourself to take off and climb to 1000’ AGL (Above Ground Level), what do you do now? The next four bites of this elephant called aviation, is level flight, climbs, descents and turns. I’ll explain them one at a time.

    Level flight is the skill of maintaining a constant altitude while also keeping the airplane on a constant heading. Constant altitude is a rather intuitive thing: nothing is moving up or down. Heading however is a technical term which means more than simply nothing is moving left or right. It can be confused with other terms like “Vector”, "Flight path", "Track" and probably a lot more.

    Heading Defined: The direction in which the nose of the aircraft is pointing during flight. It can be expressed simply as “Northwest”, “Toward the Moon”, or “Toward London”, and these visual references are perfect for communicating where your nose is pointing. Obviously, they fall short when it comes to calculating time and courses, so we need a mathematical way to express direction. We use the term “Compass” heading, expressed in degrees of azimuth which is what a magnetic compass can show us. Heading 360 is north while heading 270 is west, etc. Remember, it’s where the airplane is pointing, not necessarily where it’s going due to wind and other factors.

    Since the Directional gyro compass on the instrument panel is so unreliable in our simulator, get used to using the big, flat magnetic compass right behind the spade grip control column. All you need to know for now is that the pointer with the little “Cross” on it always points north. Therefore, If the “Cross” pointer is pointing to the left, your heading is east, to the Right, you’re heading west, towards you, and you’re heading south. For best accuracy with this “MAG” compass, you need to be in straight and level flight. Experiment with the “Course Setter” function when the mood hits you. You won’t use it today.

    Trim Exercise

    You want to be familiar with outside visual references in this lesson, so heading expressed in degrees is not as important as finding a landmark to fly towards. If you look at the distant horizon, you should be able to find either a distant landmark or a low cloud on the horizon to fly towards. Make this your initial heading by pointing the airplane at it and try to maintain that heading throughout the exercises. With the elevator trim at the 13 clicks ANU that you added in the takeoff lesson, you will find that 2650 RPM will hold level flight with gear DOWN, flaps UP with the Propeller set to FINE and no rudder input. A moderate, vibration is normal in this configuration and the airspeed indicator pointer will visibly shake. The RAF Fighters naturally tend to roll, so apply enough ailerons to make your Hurricane fly wings level. These airplanes were not and are not equipped with aileron trim so this rolling tendency is something you have to live with at this point. Many posts in the ATAG Forums offer techniques to deal with the rolling tendency, but for now you should find a light level of aileron pressure that enables straight and level flight using no back pressure on the stick. Maintain your reference heading as you work on control.

    This is the “Trimmed” condition. The plane is doing what you want without control input (Except for the light roll correction). The key to using elevator trim is realizing that you are trimmed for airspeed , not height, pitch or anything else. To demonstrate this from straight and level flight, simply add Four keypresses (clicks) of ANU trim and watch what happens. The plane will start a gentle climb, but as the airspeed decreases to about 140 MPH, the airplane will correct itself and level off again, only now it will maintain the new, lower 140 MPH trim speed. If the pitch begins to oscillate up and down, help it to stop with a tiny bit of stick pressure. The airplane will resume level flight with you only correcting the rolling tendency. To return to 150 MPH, simply remove your Trim speed change by applying four clicks AND (Down). The nose will drop, airspeed will increase, and the plane will level off at 150 MPH. To prevent exceeding 150 MPH, add a little backpressure to the stick as it seeks the higher trim speed. Return to your reference heading object when you have finished.

    Climb Exercise

    Whether cruising in a Cessna 150 or a Hurricane Fighter, trimmed airplanes climb on power, not stick pressure. To make your trimmed Hurricane climb, push the throttle up; you only need an increase of 100 RPM to make it happen. From level flight, increase the throttle to 2750 RPM and behold: The nose will pitch up in order to maintain 150 MPH with the additional power. It is a gentle change, (less than 500 FPM on your Variometer) but the more you increase thrust, the greater will be the climb rate, always searching for that trim speed of 150 MPH. You will notice a slight turning tendency at this point which requires minor aileron input to control. Just like in the trim exercise, to return to your original flight condition, simply reduce power back to 2650 RPM. Have patience and once again, control any excess oscillations with light stick pressure until you are stable again. Once again, return to your reference heading object when you have stabilized.

    Descent Exercise
    From level flight at 150 MPH, pull the throttle back a tiny amount to set 2550 RPM. The airplane will start a gentle descent of less than 500 FPM, then will seek 150 MPH and with gentle stick pressure, will stabilize in a 150 MPH descent. You should also observe a mild, turning tendency so maintain your desired heading. To level off, push the throttle back up to 2650 RPM. The turning tendency will return to normal, and you should return to your reference heading object when you complete the exercise.

    Turns Exercise

    A simple navigation turn, as opposed to a combat turn, is intended to change your heading in a controlled way in order to establish a new heading so you can fly somewhere else. This may seem simplistic, but a normal turn requires that you know where you’re going, and where you want to go. You have been correcting towards that distant aim point heading throughout this lesson, but now you feel the need to turn right 90°. Instead of just “Banking and yanking” until it looks about right, let’s use a basic VFR (Visual Flight Rules) navigation procedure.

    You are simply going to find a new “Aim Point” heading, by looking down the right wing, to find another cloud or landmark to navigate towards. This gives you the objective of the turn. Every time you turn for navigation or in combat, it is wise to pick an object to fly towards.

    Now that you know where you want to go, let’s consider the correct method for getting there. Many airplanes use steep turns to make a big heading change due to their high speed and slow rate of turn. Slower planes turn so quickly that steep turns may be too hard to control for navigation. Your Training Hurricane is in the “Happy Place” where normal turns (defined as 3° per second) approximate ordinary 30° bank angles. Furthermore, this angle coincides nicely with the side bracing of the forward canopy bow and the support brackets of the gunsight when positioned on the horizon in the turn. Another objective is to maintain your current altitude throughout the turn and these references are a big help.

    The procedure is mildly challenging as you roll into the 30° bank while gently increasing backpressure to control the tendency of the nose to drop. Stop rolling when the horizon lines up with the windscreen side brace and the gunsight bracket, then hold that picture. As you approach your new heading object, gently reverse the roll and the backpressure to roll out wings level. Recheck RPM at 2650, and you should remain all trimmed up for this new navigation leg, 90° right of your original heading, at your original altitude.

    For turns other than 90°, simply select a heading corresponding to the desired angle of turn. For a 180° turn, make two continuous 90° turns, selecting a second roll out point after 90° of turn. A midpoint rollout is not a bad idea to allow clearing the area for traffic as well as to get your bearings.

    You should practice these procedures until they are automatic before you tackle the Traffic pattern.

    The elephant is getting smaller…
    Last edited by Baffin; Mar-30-2017 at 09:31. Reason: Title Added
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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Do it Yourself Landing Training

    This "Training Hurricane" lesson breaks landing down into its constituent parts: Flying the landing pattern, configuring with landing flaps, final approach, and flare and touchdown. Like before, we bite off each piece in its turn.

    Flying the Landing Pattern

    This is your last exercise motoring around at 150 MPH with the gear down. As usual, select the runway most closely aligned with the wind. This is important because you don't want crosswind on takeoff or final approach when you are learning the basics. "Yellow Board" runway edge markers usually indicate the preferred runway. Begin this lesson by taking off, leaving the gear down, and accelerating to 150 MPH using the “Horizon in the lower 1/3 of the gun sight” picture. Don’t rush the next turn to crosswind, but keep in mind that an extended takeoff (Upwind) leg will make it difficult to keep the airport in sight when you do turn crosswind. You need to stay close enough to the airport to see the landing runway.

    Traffic Pattern.jpg
    CLICK TO ENLARGE

    Turning Crosswind

    For proper spacing, plan to turn crosswind one half to one mile past the departure end of the runway, and only after you have reached 150 MPH. Look down your left wing to find a turn reference point and at 150 MPH, make a 30° bank climbing left turn of 90° onto the “Crosswind” leg. Continue to climb at 150 MPH with 2850 RPM. After rolling out on the crosswind leg, spend only enough time to find the next turn reference point, and then turn left again onto the downwind leg. You should be close to 1000’ AGL by now so be ready to level off with 2650 RPM set. If you have set 13 clicks of ANU trim before takeoff, this will be quite simple... Just set 2650 RPM. If you forgot, you should actuate the trim to maintain 150 MPH like you’re used to doing in earlier practice sessions.

    Slowing Down for FLAPS Extension

    Things happen fast on the downwind leg due to the tailwind, so begin slowing down for flaps extension right away. Set your power to 2250 RPM, and the Hurricane will smoothly and slowly decelerate to and maintain 120 MPH. Less power, sometimes MUCH less power, may be necessary if the downwind leg is short, or if there is a strong tailwind up there. Maintain your altitude with stick backpressure and trim as desired. Glance at the airfield to remain parallel with the landing runway which should be about a mile away (about one runway length at RAF Ford). The primary reference point for configuration is the intended landing point on the runway (between the threshold and 500'). Abeam this landing point is where you would normally extend the landing gear, were it not already down. You should extend the flaps immediately before starting the base turn when the intended landing point appears to be 45° behind your left wing (Over your left shoulder). At this 45° aft point, select flaps NEUTRAL, then immediately DOWN. Look inside the cockpit to make sure that the flaps handle is in the DOWN slot, and that the flaps are moving down on the indicator. You’re now ready for base.

    The Base Turn

    Start the base turn like any other by first selecting a 90° roll out aim point and then banking left to 30°. At this point, you are no longer in the “Training” Hurricane but are flying a normal base leg and final approach. The base leg is a trimmed descent at 100 MPH with approximately 1900 RPM set to hold the desired descent path. As soon as you begin the descent, start adding ANU trim at 1-2 clicks per second, until the airspeed stabilizes at 100 MPH. If you observe the airplane getting too low, increase RPM slightly (100-200 RPM). Just like in the trim exercise, the descent will decrease while you return to a normal flight path but trim speed is still 100 MPH. If airspeed is low, lower the nose with stick or trim pressure. Your objective is to descend to a point about 300’ above the runway at 1 mile from the threshold. It’s time to turn final…

    The Final Turn and Transition to Final Approach

    The airplane is dirty (Configured) and the airspeed is low, therefore smooth, controlled flying is the emphasis at this point. When learning to land, 90 MPH is the final approach airspeed, so it is imperative that we maintain more speed than that while turning the airplane onto final. 100 MPH is the minimum safe airspeed until you are wings level on the final approach.

    Lead the final turn by about 20° and begin with 30° of bank. If you feel you are going to undershoot the final turn, you can always reduce bank to correct. But if you start the turn with too little bank, you may overshoot requiring steep bank angles to correct, resulting in an unstable approach. Roll out with the nearest end of the runway in the bottom of the gun sight and immediately reduce power to idle to establish 90 MPH while gradually trimming ANU until you have reached full trim travel. Then re-establish about 2000 RPM at 90 MPH to approximate the normal final approach power setting. Maintain speed with back pressure, and control the glide path with throttle. This power setting will vary with the steepness of your glide path so you must adjust RPM or glide path angle slightly according to your current conditions. A well stabilized final approach will have very light stick back pressure with full ANU trim in this configuration. The most common cause of bad landings is airspeed discipline; you must be stabilized at 90 MPH. Try to get this done one mile from the runway at 300' AGL. The proper final approach picture starts here.

    Final Approach

    Learning the perfect three-point landing begins when you are sitting still on the runway for takeoff. The “picture” you see while resting on the gear is the picture you should see when you touch down with full flaps at around 65 MPH (Mostly Stalled). Achieving this “Next Bite of the elephant” depends primarily on the quality of your final approach.

    The fully trimmed, 2000 RPM, 90 MPH final approach should have you aiming at the closest end of the runway, not the touchdown zone, and not the far end, as you descend. This is called, once again, your “Aim Point”. The aim point should not move in the windscreen… it should only get bigger as you get closer. The trick is to recognize the point at which you need to pull up to avoid crashing into the end of the runway. The desire to pull the nose up too early can be overpowering as it is subconsciously a survival instinct, so one way you can get a feel for the closeness of the ground is to just go ahead and hit it once or twice! That’s right, just keep the aim point constant and crash the airplane right into the threshold a few times. This is good training and is a distinct advantage of simulators over airplanes. Try to remember the approach picture you see when you are one or two seconds from the threshold in order to learn a good point for starting the flare for landing.

    Flare and Touchdown

    A good flare starts very close to the threshold at 90 MPH, so as you approach one or two seconds before the runway's end, simultaneously raise the nose with backpressure, reduce power to idle, and shift your aim point straight down the runway to the departure end to remain aligned. Reduce power at about the same rate you applied it for takeoff (1-3 seconds), and raise the nose smoothly until you are looking at the “Three point” picture discussed earlier. The runway view in front of you will be blocked by the rising nose, but by now, the landing attitude is set. If you perceive a level off or climb, release some backpressure until a descent resumes then come right back in with aft stick pressure to hold the three point picture. You will quickly be rewarded with a safe, hopefully smooth, touchdown at a nice slow speed. The perfect touchdown should require full aft stick as you "Kiss" the ground at about 65 MPH. Essentially, you have tried to level off at stall speed one inch above the surface!

    Rollout

    Tail wheel airplanes can be a handful at slow speeds when on the ground. The Hurricane has some of the best ground handling characteristics of any fighter airplane in our CLoD simulator. Your operational objective after landing should be to safely clear the runway so the pilot behind you can land.

    -Keep the stick well aft while taxiing for greater control.
    -Brakes can be used without fear of the Hurricane airplane turning onto its nose.
    -Turn off the runway while you still have enough airspeed for the rudder to be effective.
    -If necessary, add power to "Blow some wind" over the rudder to enhance rudder effectiveness.

    Once clear of the runway, run the TMPR-FFF check again to reposition the controls for the next guy. Taxi to parking is approved!

    Multiple Takeoffs

    If you prefer (For training), you may choose to "Stop and Go". If you just made a good landing, stop straight ahead on the runway and set the chocks. Make sure you have sufficient runway remaining (Six distance markers or more), then run the TMPR-FFF check to re-configure for takeoff. This is preferred over the "Touch and Go (called a Bump)" in which you re-configure while rolling out. It's hard to control a Hurricane Bump which is why the Stop & Go is safer. When ready, practice another takeoff, if you wish.

    Conclusion

    This completes the “Training Hurricane” lessons for new pilots. You should now be able to operate an Hurricane in our game without spending hours on the basics of flying. Use your flight manual to learn real Gear and Flap retraction procedures... then advance to the other fighters equipped with high Octane fuel and constant speed props using real RAF procedures. You should be ready!

    Oh, about all those bites… you’ve just finished biting off the elephant's tail. CLoD and aviation in general has a lot more “elephant” for you to enjoy! Have fun…
    Last edited by Baffin; Mar-30-2017 at 09:57. Reason: Stop & Go added.
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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Many thanks for all this great information, Baffin.

    I have never come across a forum, for any type of game\sim.

    Where information and help is so freely given and in so much abundance.

    Best regards,
    Mike.

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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogbert View Post
    Many thanks for all this great information, Baffin.

    I have never come across a forum, for any type of game\sim.

    Where information and help is so freely given and in so much abundance.

    Best regards,
    Mike.
    I think he's saying I talk too much... Who, ME?
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    Cool Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Quote Originally Posted by Baffin View Post
    I think he's saying I talk too much... Who, ME?
    Hahahahahahahaha, no way. You keep providing the info and i will keep TRYING to ingest it

    Many thanks,
    Mike.

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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Quote Originally Posted by Baffin View Post
    The recommendation in this thread is for the DeHavilland variable (2-Speed) prop, not the constant speed prop. The objective is to lower engine performance in order to reduce the new pilots' workload during training. Try it, it's simply a ton of fun!
    I have flown the 2 speed prop version of the Hurricane more times than you can imagine... I did the Flight Modeling.

    As I mentioned before, I recommend the Hurricane I Rotol 100 octane for beginners... it is the easiest of the Hurricanes to takeoff, fly and land in.

    The versions with the two speed prop have the Merlin II, which is the earlier version of the Merlin III, and which was subject to more mechanical failures, a larger chance to overheat, etc. There were a number of mechanical changes made to the Merlin III which improved reliability.

    It is very easy to over-rev the two speed prop versions if they are left in fine pitch... in fact if you climb much over 2000 ft in fine pitch, the engine will exceed max revs of 3000 rpm. The same thing will happen if you pitch the nose down and gain speed in a dive.

    I appreciate your suggestions Baffin, and the work you have put into them, you should be commended for your work for the community, but I still recommend you edit them to use the Hurri I Rotol 100 octane instead.

    Thanks

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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Quote Originally Posted by RAF74_Buzzsaw View Post
    I have flown the 2 speed prop version of the Hurricane more times than you can imagine... I did the Flight Modeling.

    As I mentioned before, I recommend the Hurricane I Rotol 100 octane for beginners... it is the easiest of the Hurricanes to takeoff, fly and land in.

    The versions with the two speed prop have the Merlin II, which is the earlier version of the Merlin III, and which was subject to more mechanical failures, a larger chance to overheat, etc. There were a number of mechanical changes made to the Merlin III which improved reliability.

    It is very easy to over-rev the two speed prop versions if they are left in fine pitch... in fact if you climb much over 2000 ft in fine pitch, the engine will exceed max revs of 3000 rpm. The same thing will happen if you pitch the nose down and gain speed in a dive.

    I appreciate your suggestions Baffin, and the work you have put into them, you should be commended for your work for the community, but I still recommend you edit them to use the Hurri I Rotol 100 octane instead.

    Thanks
    For reasons stated at the beginning of this thread, this remains a DH 5-20 87 Octane takeoff, traffic pattern and landing training scenario (no flight above 2000' and certainly no dives) for students new to aviation. I've flight checked it many times without any overheats, and have determined that while the 87 or 100 Octane (Boost Cutout Override-OFF) DH 5-20 Hurricane takes 29 seconds to reach 90 MPH, the ROTOL 100 Octane gets there in 18-19 seconds. For a new student, that extra 10 seconds on the runway is just the time needed to keep 'er going straight down the runway. Engine stress is pretty low at these power settings but failures are always possible... I've just never seen one yet.
    Last edited by Baffin; Mar-11-2017 at 15:16.
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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Quote Originally Posted by Baffin View Post
    87 Octane fuel...

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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Quote Originally Posted by RAF74_Buzzsaw View Post
    Thanks, Buzzsaw. All references to 80 Octane have been changed to 87 (I hope). ...don't know where 80 came from.
    Last edited by Baffin; Feb-25-2017 at 04:36.
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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Quote Originally Posted by Baffin View Post
    Thanks, Buzzsaw. All references to 80 Octane have been changed to 87 (I hope). ...don't know where 80 came from.
    Soviets had 78 octane for most of their aircraft at the start of the war, French had 85, US had 91, British had 87, German had 87.

    But there are some differences in how the different countries assigned an octane value.

    By the end of the war, all countries had fuels equivalent to British 100 octane, (although these higher rated fuels were not the majority of the fuel used in in Soviet Union and Germany) but only US and British had access to large amounts of fuel equivalent to 150 octane. Best high octane rated fuel of the war was the American 115/145, which was used in 1945 in the Pacific. The US was ahead of all the other nations in fuel refining technology. The British took advantage of the US friendship to acquire the higher rated technology and additives.

    The US also shipped enormous quantities of 100 octane fuel and fuel additives, as well as complete Refining Plants to the Soviets as Lendlease... the majority of the Soviet high octane Aviation fuel was from either US lendlease or from US loaned/Soviet operated Refining Plants.
    Last edited by RAF74_Buzzsaw; Feb-25-2017 at 17:48.

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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Gonna try some more this weekend with a Hurricane ROTOL 100. I'm slowly getting the hang of this.
    Last edited by Kip Chiakopf; Mar-10-2017 at 14:10.

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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Quote Originally Posted by Kip Chiakopf View Post
    Gonna try some more this weekend with a Hurricane ROTOL 100. I'm slowly getting the hang of this.
    Hurricane ROTOL 100 is fine if you have takeoff alignment all figured out. If you need more time, you can slow the takeoff roll down about 30%, by using the DH 5-20 propeller (87 or 100 Octane). The ROTOL propeller will reduce takeoff time from about 30 seconds down to 22 or less. Your preference...
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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    CLoD Hurricane takeoff time tests for different Fuel/Prop Combinations (Flaps-UP, paved runway, Zero to 90 MPH):

    Propeller / Fuel / Boost Cutout Override / Elapsed Time (Seconds)

    DH 5-20 / 87 / Not Available / 29
    DH 5-20 / 100 / OFF / 29

    DH 5-20 / 100 / ON / 22
    ROTOL / 87 / OFF / 18
    ROTOL / 87 / ON / 18
    ROTOL / 100 / OFF / 20
    ROTOL / 100 / ON / 20

    Conclusion: For training, DH 5-20 prop (BCO-OFF) will slow the takeoff. Other combinations all have similar takeoff performance. (20±2 sec.)
    Last edited by Baffin; Mar-11-2017 at 09:26. Reason: Formatting
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    Student Pilot CharlesLV's Avatar
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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Thanks for the recommendation with this! I'll give the old Hurri some time in-game and see how I go with CEM to get it right when I get into a scrap for the first time!
    Cheers!


    ~S
    Charley

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    Veteran Combat pilot Hurricane's Avatar
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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    I love my Hurri MK1 Rotol 100oct, never fly anything else.

    Tough as old boots and very forgiving, when i mess up, which is often.

    Best regards,
    Mike.
    The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt.

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    Supporting Member BOO's Avatar
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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Worst thing about the Hurri - you cant see the compass unless you is Geoffrey the giraffe

    Best Thing about the Hurri - it doesn't matter that you cant because you'll never get there in time anyhow.

    Little know fact - if you fly the hurri straight and level (try) it goes so slowly you can actually see the effects of magnetic declination on the compass as you go from A to (never quite reaching) B

    Now a Spitfire on the otherhand....

    You CAN see the compass but, as a Spitfire Pilot, are unlikely to take any notice because you'll be distracted by your own reflection in the glass.....
    My Rig: Samsung 40" TV, Asus Z170 Pro Gaming Mobo, I5 6600K @ 4.4Ghz on a Coolermaster 212 Evo, MSI GTX1080 Gaming X, 16B Vengeance DDR4 RAM @3000Mhz, Couple of meh SSDs, Corsair 550W CX PSU, MFG Crosswinds, TM WH Throttle, Virpil Mongoose T50CM w/100mm extension, TIR5, EDtracker pro.


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    Veteran Combat pilot Hurricane's Avatar
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    Talking Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Looking in the mirror to slap another huge dollop of brylcream on your hair is it, Boost ?

    Anyway i don't need to see the compass, don't mean squat to me at all.

    Best regards,
    Mike.
    The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt.

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    Re: New Pilot First RAF Fighter Airplane Recommendation - Hurricane MkI

    Thank you! I've played WW1 sims for years, but switching to WW2 has been an experience...

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