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Thread: Critical Engine

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    Novice Pilot 9./JG52 Hackl's Avatar
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    Critical Engine

    Is Critical Engine(s) on multi-engine aircraft actually model in CLoD?

    Also is there any of the multiengine aircraft in CLoD that are counter rotating to each other.

    I am assuming at this stage in the war that engines on the same aircraft are turning the same direction as viewed by the pilot ie clockwise or CCW making one of them critical during an outage or power loss.

    Just curious.
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    Supporting Member Tibsun's Avatar
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    Re: Critical Engine

    Quote Originally Posted by 9./JG52 Hackl View Post
    Is Critical Engine(s) on multi-engine aircraft actually model in CLoD?

    Also is there any of the multiengine aircraft in CLoD that are counter rotating to each other.

    I am assuming at this stage in the war that engines on the same aircraft are turning the same direction as viewed by the pilot ie clockwise or CCW making one of them critical during an outage or power loss.

    Just curious.
    I think it does, but I could try and test this, by shutting one of a time off.

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    TF Leadership RAF74_Buzzsaw's Avatar
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    Re: Critical Engine

    None of the current twin engined types have engines which have props which are counter-rotating.

    This feature is possible in the game... so for example, if we added the P-38, it would have one engine which turned the prop clockwise, and another which turned the prop counter-clockwise.
    Last edited by RAF74_Buzzsaw; Oct-10-2018 at 20:24.

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    Novice Pilot 9./JG52 Hackl's Avatar
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    Re: Critical Engine

    So as I sit in my 109 the prop rotates to the right. At higher power settings the plane want to roll to left due engine torque and other factors effects.

    So if a twin had both engines turning the same direction say clockwise viewed from cockpit like 109, Taking out the left engine would create some real control-ability issues for that pilot.
    It would Harder to fly straight and maintain altitude let alone being able to climb at all due to torque effects wanting to roll the aircraft always left while running only on right engine.

    If right engine were taken out instead of the left engine a pilot could still manage adequately because torque works for him lift the right (heavy) wing.

    Which engine is critical depends on which direction they rotate.

    For fighter pilots taking out the left engine on a twin aircraft should aid in dispatch (killing, crippling) it.

    probably main reason lightning was one of the first aircraft to have counter-rotating props.

    found this:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TNHZ...Shl972CPX4O-0B
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    Re: Critical Engine

    I tried it out on the Bf 110, couldn't really find that critical engine is modeled that way.
    There was very little noticeable roll having slip balanced with rudder trying both engines, each one at a time.
    I found less rolling happend with the loss of the left engine and the right engines operating with a clock wise rotation ...
    so the opposite but very very little... almost not worth to mention

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    Supporting Member 9./JG52 Pans's Avatar
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    Re: Critical Engine

    Quote Originally Posted by 9./JG52 Hackl View Post
    So as I sit in my 109 the prop rotates to the right. At higher power settings the plane want to roll to left due engine torque and other factors effects.

    So if a twin had both engines turning the same direction say clockwise viewed from cockpit like 109, Taking out the left engine would create some real control-ability issues for that pilot.
    It would Harder to fly straight and maintain altitude let alone being able to climb at all due to torque effects wanting to roll the aircraft always left while running only on right engine.

    If right engine were taken out instead of the left engine a pilot could still manage adequately because torque works for him lift the right (heavy) wing.
    It's not solely the torque though, is it? I don't profess any expertise and apologise if I'm talking rubbish, but I was under the impression that the torque / yaw was a symptom of losing lift and losing prop wash over the control surfaces (vertical stabiliser, rudder).

    If that is the case, then I guess properly implementing critical engines would come down to how aerodynamics may (or may not) be modelled in the game; something of which I have zero knowledge!

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    Re: Critical Engine

    I'm hard-pressed to find a combat application for critical engine considerations. It will be a factor only in low speed emergencies.

    "Critical engine" as far as I know, is a designation applied when an engine fails during takeoff only after there is no longer enough runway ahead to stop. Volumes have been written about the "Critical Engine Failure Speed" concept but it involves a plethora of factors involving the turning effect of high pitch angles as well as a bunch of design factors such as engine placement and angle etc. Of course, available runway length is a pivotal consideration.

    In the Jet age, it has become a performance issue... Is there enough thrust to reach takeoff speed before I run out of runway? Is there enough runway remaining to abort? Of course, the most critical situation is engine failure right before takeoff speed. This is the so-called "V1 Cut" situation, the standard against which all takeoff emergency training is directed.

    In multi-engine propeller operations, some airplanes can continue to take off, some can't. The flight manual will always have guidance for the pilot in a V1 cut situation.

    Usually, propeller airplanes advise closing the throttles and landing straight ahead. Jet pilots practice continuing the takeoff ad nauseum in the simulator. With enough training, it becomes second nature.

    In flight at or near V2 (Takeoff Speed), remember the old Q & A:

    Q. What does the good engine do if the critical engine fails?
    A. It takes you directly to the scene of the accident!
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    Novice Pilot Oldsalt's Avatar
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    Re: Critical Engine

    Quote Originally Posted by Baffin View Post
    ...In flight at or near V2 (Takeoff Speed), remember the old Q & A:

    Q. What does the good engine do if the critical engine fails?
    A. It takes you directly to the scene of the accident!
    Until today I had always thought that most IFR accidents in general aviation were due to an engine failure during takeoff. Surviving one requires taking quick and correct actions. But after checking it out, it seems that engines are so reliable these days, that cause is only a statistical blip.

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    Re: Critical Engine

    Multi-engine critical engine failure operations really have nothing to do with weather conditions or the type of flight plan. (IFR vs VFR)

    Continuing a takeoff after V2 with an engine failure simply involves training in decision making (Whether or not to Go or Stop), and if the takeoff is continued, how to do it. Continuing to takeoff requires a lot of practice with throttle, rudder and aileron to bank into the good engine, and some airplanes just do not have enough power to pull it off. We can practice it in the RAF Bristol Blenheim right here in CLoD... and it gets pretty sporty until you get used to it! The RAF Pilot's notes can tell you how.
    If you're still interested, see page 12-19 and following in the FAA's "How to fly" book:

    https://www.faa.gov/regulations_poli...4_afh_ch12.pdf
    Last edited by Baffin; Oct-16-2018 at 21:23.
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