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Thread: War Emergency Power?

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    War Emergency Power?

    Is WEP used in British aircraft?

    What is Cbt Emer in CoD Aircraft Operations Checklists/Spitfire Mk I/Limiting Operational Conditions table?

    Thanks.

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    Supporting Member Baffin's Avatar
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    Re: War Emergency Power?

    In RAF Fighters, the supercharger is automatically regulated by the engine control systems. No Pilot input is required to get the optimum safe supercharger pressure. Boost Cutout Override (BCO) is a real life feature that allowed the pilot to bypass the safeguards of this system. It is an EMERGENCY procedure which allows the pilot to override the boost cutout control feature in order to permit unlimited pressure output from the supercharger. The Spitfire has a copper "Gate" wire that would break if you pushed the throttle far enough forward to activate BCO and required a logbook entry if you actually used it because BCO caused a definite overload condition requiring maintenance inspections. That's the actual system employed by RAF Spitfires and Hurricanes.

    In a lot of WW2 airplane games, this "Max Power" feature is called "WEP" (War Emergency Power), but here it's called "BCO" (Boost Cutout Override).

    And since this is a video game...

    Unrealistically, you can use BCO to increase power in the game and with "Gaming" propeller and radiator shutter settings, the engine will likely not fail. It's a gamers' option in the simulation that was not permitted in real life.

    Some of us enhance the realism of operating these engines by following the Rolls-Royce restrictions but no one will ever know if you (or I) choose to bend the rules occasionally.

    Combat Emergency is an otherwise undefined term determined aurally by the sound of gunfire aft of you, visually by the smile on the enemy pilot's face in the rear-view mirror, or thermally by the warm fluid running down your leg.
    Last edited by Baffin; Mar-26-2020 at 20:01.
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    Re: War Emergency Power?

    What is Slow-Running Cut-Out then for?

    Thanks!

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    Supporting Member Marco's Avatar
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    Re: War Emergency Power?

    In RAF aircraft fitted with 'slow-running cut out' it is the prescribed method of shutting down the engine rather than just turning off the fuel.

    I can't for the life of me remember the advantages IRL over just turning off the fuel but it has something to do with fuel in the cylinders, hot engines and starting up again.

    ~S~
    Possunt quia posse videntur (They can because they think they can) - 19 Squadron (originally Virgil)

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    Re: War Emergency Power?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sabrefly View Post
    What is Slow-Running Cut-Out then for?

    Thanks!
    The normal shutdown procedure for a real Spitfire is to first, shut OFF the fuel supply valves in order to deplete the fuel in the lines. In the actual airplane, there are two valves, but CLoD only has one.

    Next, as the fuel in the supply lines is exhausted, which can take more than a minute, the engine will sputter and start to shut down due to fuel starvation. Rolls-Royce (R-R) wanted to prevent detonation damage to the pistons and valves when the depleted fuel mixture becomes extremely lean. To prevent this damage, R-R installed the slow-run cut-out valve which instantly stops all fuel to the engine cylinders, thereby stopping the combustion cycle.

    This fuel starvation method of engine shutdown is almost universal in carburetor equipped gasoline powered aircraft but the RAF "Empty the fuel lines" procedure strikes me as odd since it would seem to provoke vapor lock on restart. Somehow, I think the boys at the Merlin factory took this into consideration way back when.

    In CLoD, both the fuel supply valves and the slow-run cutout feature act instantly to stop the engine so it's not possible to realistically simulate burning the fuel between the fuel tank outlet and the carburetor bowl anyhow.
    Last edited by Baffin; Mar-27-2020 at 09:20.
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    Re: War Emergency Power?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sabrefly View Post
    Is WEP used in British aircraft?
    Short answer:

    No, in CloD WEP is only for some German planes.

    For British (and Italian) planes is used Boost Cut-Out, a different system, but for game purpose the same effect: extra power.

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    Re: War Emergency Power?

    Quote Originally Posted by irinatroyanova View Post
    what's up with dat virus
    You are either sick or very much confused, student pilot Irina Troyanova.

    If you really think this is a proper thread to post fragments of your thoughts, pls see a doctor anyway.

    Good luck.

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    Re: War Emergency Power?

    Quote Originally Posted by irinatroyanova View Post
    we are all gonna die
    I accidentally clicked "Like". What's to like?
    Last edited by Baffin; Mar-28-2020 at 10:25.
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    Re: War Emergency Power?

    Did WEP addan amount of water to the fuel in real life?

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    Re: War Emergency Power?

    Quote Originally Posted by JackMaXX View Post
    Did WEP addan amount of water to the fuel in real life?
    No, water injection was not used at this stage of the war.

    Water injection is called MW-50 by the Germans. It had a 50/50 mix of methanol and water.

    Americans called it 'Water Injection'.

    British did not use it except in experimental situations, they relied on high octane fuel, intercoolers and increased compression.

    Existing WEP/Boost Cutout adds extra fuel and higher compression.

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    Re: War Emergency Power?

    in real life ,can you fly the Spit 100oc Ia with the emergency power all the time and not break the engine?
    Last edited by addict; Mar-29-2020 at 05:28.

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    Re: War Emergency Power?

    Quote Originally Posted by addict View Post
    in real life ,can you fly the Spit 100oc Ia with the emergency power all the time and not break the engine?
    BCO is an emergency option. Read post #2 above, please. For the source, download and read the RAF Pilots Notes.
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    Re: War Emergency Power?

    Quote Originally Posted by addict View Post
    in real life ,can you fly the Spit 100oc Ia with the emergency power all the time and not break the engine?
    The boost cut out does not do any chemical mumbo jumbo. It just allows you to get some additional boost. And logically this happens only, if you push the throttle all the way forward.
    It it is correct, what somebody wrote above, you had to break a little copper wire to do so.

    You can tun on the 'Boost Cut Out' and leave it like this for the whole flight.
    It will start to work only, when you push the throttle forward all the way. Ony then you have to watch the temperatures. If they get to high, just reduce throttle, no need to turn out the 'Boost Cut Out' because (see above) it works only if you push the throttle to the end.
    Turning it out again would be somewhat similar to trying to repair the little copper wire during flight home.

    This is the same in all planes, Spits, Hurricanes, Beaufighters, Blennies etc.

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